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Engineering / green building science fair project:
Thermal Envelope Efficiency




Science Fair Project Information
Title: Thermal Envelope Efficiency
Subject: Engineering
Grade level: High School - Grades 10-12
Academic Level: Ordinary
Project Type: Experimental
Cost: Low
Awards: Google Science Fair 2011 finalist
Affiliation: Google Science Fair
Year: 2011
Materials and Techniques: Thermal leak detector infrared thermometer, heat map
Description: This project tries to identify home wall areas that are less insulated and therefore more leaking heat like areas around windows and doors. This was achieved by using a thermal leak detector and by examining south-facing walls and by creating a heat map based on one-foot-by-one-foot grids of the walls to visually demonstrate areas where the temperature gradient was higher than others.
Link: http://sites.google.com/site/jawthermalenvelopeefficiency/home
Short Background

Building Envelope

The building envelope is the physical separator between the interior and the exterior environments of a building. Another emerging term is "Building Enclosure". It serves as the outer shell to help maintain the indoor environment (together with the mechanical conditioning systems) and facilitate its climate control. Building envelope design is a specialized area of architectural and engineering practice that draws from all areas of building science and indoor climate control.

Control of air flow is important to ensure indoor air quality, control energy consumption, avoid condensation (and thus help ensure durability), and to provide comfort. Control of air movement includes flow through the enclosure (the assembly of materials that perform this function is termed the air barrier system) or through components of the building envelope (interstitial) itself, as well as into and out of the interior space, (which can affect building insulation performance greatly). Hence, air control includes the control of windwashing and convective loops.

The physical components of the envelope include the foundation, roof, walls, doors and windows. The dimensions, performance and compatibility of materials, fabrication process and details, their connections and interactions are the main factors that determine the effectiveness and durability of the building enclosure system.

The thermal envelope (or heat flow control layer) is usually different than the building envelope. The difference can be illustrated by understanding that an insulated attic floor is the primary thermal control layer between the inside of the house and the exterior while the entire roof (from the surface of the shingles to the interior paint finish on the ceiling) comprises the building envelope.

Building Envelope Thermography involves using an infrared camera to view temperature anomalies on the interior and exterior surfaces of the structure. Analysis of infrared images can be useful in identifying moisture issues from water intrusion, or internal condensation.

See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Building_envelope

Source: Wikipedia (All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License and Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

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