Julian's Science Fair
Projects by Grade Level
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th
Home Primary School Elementary School Middle School High School Easy Projects Advanced Award Winning

Biotechnology science fair project:
What are Genetically Modified Organisms


Science Fair Project Information
Title: What are Genetically Modified Organisms?
Subject: Biotechnology
Grade level: High School - Grades 10-12
Academic Level: Ordinary
Project Type: Descriptive
Cost: Low
Awards: 2nd place, Canada Wide Virtual Science Fair (2003)
Affiliation: Canada Wide Virtual Science Fair
Description: This project describes how both genetically modified plants and animals are created and side effects that genetic modification cause. A questionnaire was composed in order to find out what does the average person think and know about genetic modification.
Link: http://www.virtualsciencefair.org/2003/britt3m/public_html
Short Background

A genetically modified organism (GMO) or genetically engineered organism (GEO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. These techniques are generally known as recombinant DNA technology. With this technology, DNA molecules from different sources are combined into one molecule to create a new set of genes. This DNA is then transferred into an organism, giving it modified or novel traits.

Examples of GMOs are highly diverse, and include transgenic (genetically modified by recombinant DNA methods) animals such as mice, fish, transgenic plants, or various microbes, such as fungi and bacteria. The generation and use of GMOs has many reasons, chief among them are their use in research that addresses fundamental or applied questions in biology or medicine, for the production of pharmaceuticals and industrial enzymes, and for direct, and often controversial, applications aimed at improving human health (e.g., gene therapy) or agriculture (e.g., golden rice). The term "genetically modified organism" does not always imply, but can include, targeted insertions of genes from one into another species. For example, a gene from a jellyfish, encoding a fluorescent protein called GFP, can be physically linked and thus co-expressed with mammalian genes to identify the location of the protein encoded by the GFP-tagged gene in the mammalian cell. These and other methods are useful and indispensable tools for biologists in many areas of research, including those that study the mechanisms of human and other diseases or fundamental biological processes in eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells.

For More Information: Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

Source: Wikipedia (All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License)

Useful Links
Science Fair Projects Resources
Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering Resources
Citation Guides, Style Manuals, Reference
General Safety Resources
Electrical Safety FAQ
Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering Science Fair Project Books

The Orchid Grower - A Juvenile Science Adventure Novel
The Orchid Grower
A Juvenile Science Adventure Novel
About Genetic Engineering





Follow Us On:
       

Privacy Policy - About Us

Comments and inquiries could be addressed to:
webmaster@julianTrubin.com


Last updated: June 2013
Copyright 2003-2013 Julian Rubin