Julian's Science Fair
Projects by Grade Level
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th
Home Primary School Elementary School Middle School High School Easy Projects Advanced Award Winning

Botany science fair project:
How does acid rain affect plants?


Science Fair Project Information
Title: How does acid rain affect plants?
Subject: Botany
Grade level: Primary School / Kindergarten - Grades K-3
Project Type: Experimental
Cost: Low
Awards: None
Affiliation: Timber Ridge Virtual Science Fair
Link: http://www.collaboratory.nunet.net/timber/scifair/kindto4/9.htm
Short Background

Acid rain is where chemicals in the air combine with rain and make the water more acidic.

Normally, the pHvalue of rain is about 5.6, which means it is a weak acid. Other chemicals can make this a stronger acid if they react with it. When this rain falls to the ground, it can kill fish in the rivers, harm plants, and dissolve building materials. This is why many gravestones are unreadable.

The most common chemicals which do this are oxides of sulphur and nitrogen, which are put into the air by power stations and vehicles (such as cars). There are also some natural causes, like volcanoes and biological processes that happen on the land, in wetlands, and in the oceans.

Many countries are trying to reduce the amount of acid rain by agreeing to treaties, and by taking part in emissions trading. In the United States, many power stations use a process called Flue gas desulphurization (FGD) to reduce the sulphur in the gases that are made.

Acid rain can make forests grow slower, or even destroy them. This affects animals and their natural habitats. Acid rain can also pollute a water supply, and this may not be noticed because the water will look the same. It would also hurt or in some cases it has been known to burn people and kill small mammals such as cats and dogs and mice. It could be a contributing factor to other diseases such as Cancer and Alzheimer. It could corrode metals such as TV aerials, cars, but that will have to be very very strong acid.

See also: Acid Rain K-12 Experiments & Background Information

Source: Wikipedia (All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License)


Useful Links
Science Fair Projects Resources
Botany Resources
Photosynthesis Resources
Citation Guides, Style Manuals, Reference
General Safety Resources
Electrical Safety FAQ
Botany Science Fair Books

              






Follow Us On:
       

Privacy Policy - About Us

Comments and inquiries could be addressed to:
webmaster@julianTrubin.com


Last updated: June 2013
Copyright 2003-2013 Julian Rubin